Stefan Elias' Sunday bread

A crunchy sugary cinnamon bite at the top, a mild and creamy soft crumb on the inside, a divine teatime treat.


* for one bread of 400 grams

  • 180 grams of flour
  • 45 grams of lukewarm milk
  • 45 grams of egg (equals more or less 1 egg)
  • 20 grams of fresh yeast (or 10 grams of dry yeast)
  • 15 grams of granulated sugar
  • 3 grams of salt
  • 2 grams of cinnamon
  • 55 grams of butter at room temperature
  • 40 grams of pearl sugar
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 60 grams of streusel

You need a buttered baking mould or loaf tin with a content of more or less 1 l.
Preheat the oven at 190°C.

* the streusel

For 135 grams of streusel (you can use it to make two Sunday breads for instance)

  • 20 grams of butter at room temperature
  • 30 grams of pearl sugar
  • 50 grams of granulated sugar
  • 1 gram of cinnamon
  • 10 grams of pealed and crushed almonds
  • 15 grams of flour


* the streusel

Soften the butter in a bowl. Add the sugars, the cinnamon, the crushed almonds and blend it together until you obtain an even mixture.
Finally also add the flour and blend it again to get a crumbly texture.

* the Sunday bread

Crumble the yeast and blend it smoothly with the lukewarm milk and the eggs.
Add the flour, the butter, the sugar and the salt and mix it, also add the cinnamon at the end.
Knead the dough intensively on the kitchen worktop and add the pearl sugar to the dough.
Leave it to rest for about 10 minutes.
Round the dough and leave it to rest for another 20 minutes.
Put the shaped dough in the buttered loaf tin and leave the bread to rise for 60 to 70 minutes.
Before baking the bread, cover it with the beaten egg and generously sprinkle the streusel on top of it.
Bake the Sunday bread for 25 to 30 minutes in the preheated oven at a temperature of 190°C, dropping the temperature to 180°C.

Smakelijk, and bon appétit!

The story about the creation of the Sunday bread is the result of the many journeys Jacques Bloch undertook. One day there was a Frenchman in the bakery who asked for a cinnamon bread. The customer told Mr Bloch he used to buy it in Roubaix in France, but he said it was hard to find lately. In response to his request, Mr Bloch told him to come back the next week and it would be ready for him. As Jacques Bloch remembered eating a sweet cinnamon pastry one day in a small café somewhere in the desert he got to work. So the French customer came back the next week and got what he asked for, his intense delight inspired and the Sunday bread was a true bonanza.

I had the pleasure to bake with Stefan Elias, the former baker of Jacques Bloch. To understand how I feel about bread and what it means to me, read the episode Baking session with Stefan Elias.

Recipe credit to Stefan Elias and special thanks to M.en.S. Media for the authorization to publish the recipe.